Sciences humaines & sociales

  • Anglais THIS CHANGES EVERYTHING

    Naomi Klein

    Naomi Klein, author of the #1 international bestsellers, The Shock Doctrine and No Logo, returns with This Changes Everything, a must-read on how the climate crisis needs to spur transformational political change We seem to have given up on any serious effort to prevent catastrophic climate change. Despite mounting scientific evidence, denialism is surging in many wealthy countries, and extreme fossil-fuel extraction gathers pace. Exposing the work of ideologues on the right who know the challenge this poses to the free market all too well, Naomi Klein also challenges the failing strategies of environmental groups. This Changes Everything argues that the deep changes required should not be viewed as punishments to fear, but as a kind of gift. It's time to stop running from the full implications of the crisis and begin to embrace them.

    Naomi Klein is an award-winning journalist, syndicated columnist and author of the international bestsellers, The Shock Doctrine and No Logo. She is a member of the board of directors for 350.org, a global grassroots movement to solve the climate crisis, a Puffin Foundation Writing Fellow at The Nation Institute, and a former Miliband Fellow at the LSE. She holds an honorary Doctor of Civil Laws from the University of King's College, Nova Scotia.

  • The Elizabethan age was a tumultuous time, when long-cherished certainties were crumbling and life was exhilaratingly uncertain. From knife crime to belief in witches, religious battles to the horizons of the New World, this title brings the past to life in a fresh, unexpected portrait of a dangerous and dynamic era.

  • Living with the gods

    Neil Macgregor

    A panoramic exploration of peoples, objects and beliefs over 40,000 years from the celebrated author of A History of the World in 100 Objects and Germany , following the new BBC Radio 4 documentary and British Museum exhibition. One of the central facts of human existence is that every society shares a set of beliefs and assumptions - a faith, an ideology, a religion - that goes far beyond the life of the individual. These beliefs are an essential part of a shared identity. They have a unique power to define - and to divide - us, and are a driving force in the politics of much of the world today. Throughout history they have most often been, in the widest sense, religious. Yet this book is not a history of religion, nor an argument in favour of faith. It is about the stories which give shape to our lives, and the different ways in which societies imagine their place in the world. Looking across history and around the globe, it interrogates objects, places and human activities to try to understand what shared beliefs can mean in the public life of a community or a nation, how they shape the relationship between the individual and the state, and how they help give us our sense of who we are. For in deciding how we live with our gods, we also decide how to live with each other. 'The new blockbuster by the museums maestro Neil MacGregor ... The man who chronicles world history through objects is back ... examining a new set of objects to explore the theme of faith in society' Sunday Times

  • The first short, single-volume history of the continent, from the author of the bestselling A Short History of Englandbr>br>Europe has for two millennia been a remarkably successful continent. In this dazzling new history, bestselling author Simon Jenkins tells the story of its evolution from a battlefield of warring tribes to peace, wealth and freedom - a story that twists and turns from Greece and Rome, through the Middle Ages, Reformation and French Revolution, to the two World Wars and the present day.br>br>Jenkins embraces individuals from Julius Caesar and Joan of Arc, to Wellington and Angela Merkel, as well as cultural figures from Aristotle to Shakespeare and Picasso. Tracing themes down the ages, from youthful ambition and religious conflict to geographical constraints and invasion, he brings together the key forces and dominant periods into one chronological narrative - all with his usual insight, colour and authority.br>br>While experiencing almost constant turbulence, Europe has left an indelible mark on the world. How did one small continent become so powerful? How did these diverse peninsulas and islands, over time, develop a collective consciousness? How did diplomacy so often collapse into bloodshed, and what are the implications of this today? br>br>Despite the importance of Europe''s politics, economy and culture, there has not been - until now - a concise book to tell this story. Covering the key events, eras and individuals, Jenkins'' portrait of the continent could not be more timely - or more masterful.br>br>''Full of stand-out facts ... absolutely fascinating'' - Richard Bacon, BBC Radio 2, on A Short History of Englandbr>br>''Masterly, perhaps a masterpiece'' - Independent, Books of the Year on England''s Thousand Best Churchesbr>br>''Jenkins is, like all good guides, more than simply informative: he can be courteous and rude, nostalgic and funny, elegant, convincing and relaxed'' - Adam Nicolson on England''s Thousand Best Houses, Evening Standardbr>br>''Full of the good judgements one might hope for from such a sensible and readable commentator, and they alone are worth perusing for pleasure and food for thought'' - Michael Wood on A Short History of England, New Statesmanbr>br>''Any passably cultured inhabitant of the British Isles should ask for, say, three or four copies of this book'' - Max Hastings on England''s Thousand Best Houses, Sunday Telegraph>

  • In the summer of 1940, the French army was one of the largest and best in the world, confident of victory. In the space of a few nightmarish weeks all that changed as the French and their British allies were crushed and eight million people fled their homes. This book describes the consequences of that defeat.

  • The cold war

    Gaddis John Lewis

    Beginning with the Second World War, and ending with the collapse of the Soviet Union, this book provides an account of the strategic dynamics that drove that age. As Britain finds itself in a global confrontation with an implacable ideological enemy, this book tells a story whose lessons are necessary to understand.

  • Anglais Washington

    Ron Chernow

    The celebrated Ron Chernow provides a richly nuanced portrait of the father of America. With a breadth and depth matched by no other one-volume life, he carries the reader through Washington's troubled boyhood, his precocious feats in the French and Indian Wars, his creation of Mount Vernon, his heroic exploits with the Continental Army, his presiding over the Constitutional Convention and his magnificent performance as America's first president.


    Despite the reverence his name inspires Washington remains a waxwork to many readers, worthy but dull, a laconic man of remarkable self-control. But in this groundbreaking work Chernow revises forever the uninspiring stereotype. He portrays Washington as a strapping, celebrated horseman, elegant dancer and tireless hunter, who guarded his emotional life with intriguing ferocity. Not only did Washington gather around himself the foremost figures of the age, including James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, John Adams, and Thomas Jefferson, he orchestrated their actions to help realise his vision for the new federal government, define the separation of powers, and establish the office of the presidency.


    Ron Chernow takes us on a page-turning journey through all the formative events of America's founding. This is a magisterial work from one of America's foremost writers and historians.

  • Signal and the noise, the

    Nate Silver

    Reveals how we can all develop better foresight in an uncertain world. From the stock market to the poker table, from earthquakes to the economy, the author takes us on an enthralling insider's tour of the high-stakes world of forecasting, showing how we can use information in a smarter way amid a noise of data - and make predictions in our lives.

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